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Matthew, Otto being retired as Atlantic tropical storm names

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Posted at 11:29 AM, Mar 27, 2017
and last updated 2019-03-26 07:25:47-04

MIAMI (AP) - The names Matthew and Otto have been retired for Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes following the deadly 2016 season.

According to a statement Monday from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the World Meteorological Organization will use Martin and Owen for future Atlantic storms. The new names might first be used in 2022.

Names get retired when a storm is so deadly or destructive that future use of its name would be insensitive.
Hurricane Matthew caused 585 deaths, including over 500 deaths in Haiti before it made landfall in Cuba, the Bahamas and South Carolina. It was the strongest Atlantic hurricane since 2007 and the deadliest Atlantic hurricane since 2005.

Heavy rainfall and flooding from Hurricane Otto caused 18 deaths in Central America.

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Scripps National Desk
1:29 PM, Dec 17, 2018

2021 STORM NAMES

Ana

Bill

Claudette

Danny

Elsa

Fred

Grace

Henri

Ida

Julian

Kate

Larry

Mindy

Nicholas

Odette

Peter

Rose

Sam

Teresa

Victor

Wanda

TERMS TO KNOW

TROPICAL STORM WATCH: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified coastal area within 48 hours.

TROPICAL STORM WARNING: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected within the specified coastal area within 36 hours.

HURRICANE WATCH: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible somewhere within the specified coastal area. A hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

HURRICANE WARNING: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified coastal area. A hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.