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Cleanup begins after Boynton Beach waterfront restaurant flooded by Hurricane Nicole

6 inches of water enters Two Georges Waterfront Grille
Two Georges restaurant flooded by Hurricane Nicole, Nov. 9, 2022
Posted at 6:26 PM, Nov 10, 2022

BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. — Significant flooding occurred in Boynton Beach after Hurricane Nicole roared ashore overnight.

The rising tide brought waters from the Intracoastal Waterway into the Two Georges Waterfront Grille.

The restaurant owner said the water was at least a couple of feet high outside and just a bit made its way inside.

"It definitely came up pretty high, probably 2 1/2, 3 feet up on that swing right there," Steve Scaggs with Two Georges said.

Steve Scaggs, son of Two Georges owner, describes what it was like seeing the water rise amid Hurricane Nicole
Steve Scaggs describes what it was like seeing the water rise amid Hurricane Nicole.

Scaggs said he watched WPTV's news coverage as we reported from outside the restaurant.

"It's kinda funky seeing you guys up here, and that's all going on," he said.

Captain Chip Shehan with Chips Ahoy Fishing Charters is reeling it all.

"Last night we were almost swimming on the dock," he said. "It's amazing to see how the water changes in the amount of time that it does."

Shehan was out there all night, and WPTV talked to him during the storm.

"I've never seen the tide as high as it is right now no, just nerve-wracking," Shehan said at the time Nicole was impacting the area.

Boat captain Chip Shehan says he has never seen water that high in the harbor.
Boat captain Chip Shehan says he has never seen water that high in the harbor.

Over on the residential side of the Boynton Harbor Marina, the water line was close to the front doors.

"It was a little iffy, ya know, because of storm surge and rains were whipping," Dan Calelo, a resident, said.

After witnessing Hurricane Nicole, diners took it all in.

"Yesterday, we stayed in the condo, because it was crazy outside, and we were afraid to receive a coconut on our head," one man said.

They said the Florida breeze and the water went from threatening back to beautiful.

"It's wonderful, wonderful," one couple said.

This is a reminder that we continue to be in awe of tropical weather.

"Feel like we dodged another one," Scaggs said. "We are pretty fortunate, I feel like."

The restaurant owner said they had about 6 inches of water that came through their doors.

Employees spent Thursday mopping up the water and mud and drying out the restaurant.

The owner said he was watching WPTV and also monitoring cameras for an inside look at what was happening.

It was back to business Thursday and everyone was breathing a sigh of relief that things are getting back to normal.

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