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South Florida Ukrainians, churches helping Ukraine

No let-up from Russia's continued assault against Ukraine
Irina Maxfield.PNG
Posted at 10:12 PM, Mar 02, 2022

BOCA RATON, Fla. — There was no let-up Wednesday from Russia's continued assault against Ukraine. Their invasion was met with strong resistance.

South Floridians with loved ones in Ukraine and South Florida churches are helping half a world away.

Iryna Maxfield is a Ukrainian ex-patriot who's lived in the United States for years. She said Russia's aggression is disturbingly similar to the events nearly one century ago.

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"What we studied at school historically when the communists came to take over Ukraine in the '30s, they killed Ukrainians that had houses, businesses. The same situation they are repeating now," she said.

Maxfield works for the St. Nicholas Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Broward County.

She said to see what is going on in her home country she knew the church had to get involved. They've created a poster to drum up financial support.

"What they are going through right now, it's getting worse and worse," Maxfield said. "And the supplies are ending like nothing is working. So all kinds of help are appreciated."

Maxfield said, so far, the church has raised $3,500. That money will be used to purchase supplies in Poland and then transferred to Ukraine.

Maxfield isn't alone in her efforts. At the Slavic Bible Church in Boca Raton, the Rev. Daniel Naberezhnaya said the invasion is a global tragedy.

"Not just for Eastern Europe, for Russia and Ukraine, but for the whole world, because it involves everyone including the United States," he said.

Last weekend, his church held a fundraiser and raised $10,000 to help people in Ukraine. This weekend, they're holding an event with an attorney on immigration.

"For free she agrees to help and advise people on their issues because lots of people from Ukraine they're looking for ways to get out of the country, from other states like Poland, those who are stuck on borders," he said.

Both Maxfield and Naberezhnaya said they've been able to stay in contact with friends or family in Ukraine despite the heavy bombing.