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'Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Adaptation' removed from Vero Beach High School library

Original 'Diary of Anne Frank' remains at school libraries
Posted at 5:04 PM, Apr 05, 2023

VERO BEACH, Fla. — Since its new policy was approved about a month ago, four books have been removed from school libraries in Indian River County.

Among the latest is a graphic adaptation of the life of Anne Frank, a teenager who hid from the Nazis for two years during World War II. Frank was discovered and later died in a concentration camp during the Holocaust.

The book, titled "Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Adaptation," was recently removed from the Vero Beach High School library after a parent group expressed concerns.

"We think true history absolutely needs to be taught, the Holocaust, the Anne Frank diary," Jennifer Pippin, who chairs the Indian River County chapter of Moms For Liberty, said.

Jennifer Pippin outlines the concerns that Moms For Liberty had about the book.
Jennifer Pippin outlines the concerns that Moms For Liberty had about the book.

She argues that in one graphic scene in the book, Frank asks a friend to expose themselves to one another.

In another scene, Frank walks along nude statues that are sexually explicit, according to Pippin.

Dr. Kyra Schafte, the director of academic compliance and equity for the district said the original "Diary of Anne Frank" is still in school libraries.

The graphic adaptation was removed after it was brought to the attention of the principal. It was later determined that some of its text did not contribute to the themes of Holocaust education.

"When districts address Holocaust education, it does so without denying or minimizing the events of Holocaust education," Schafte said.

The other three titles were taken out of a middle school, all part of a series entitled "Assassination Classroom."

Dr. Kyra Schafte discusses the removal of the book about Anne Frank.
Dr. Kyra Schafte discusses the removal of the book about Anne Frank.

"In these times, the content did not promote behaviors we would want our students to have access to," Schafte said.

Books being removed from school libraries has been one of the more controversial topics this year.

In Indian River County, a newly created "District Objection Committee" met for the first time this week.

It is made up of nine people, containing a mixture of parents appointed by school board members and district employees, including someone with an educational media specialist certificate.

The committee will meet if there are formal challenges for books to be removed district-wide.

Schafte said the district is proud of the work principals are doing as initial gatekeepers.

"In changing times and keeping up with statutes and policies, they're doing a fantastic job," Schafte said.

While there are no formal book challenges to discuss yet, Pippin said her group has about 250 titles they plan to challenge in the future.