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5 Things To Know On Thursday, September 24, 2020

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Posted at 6:35 AM, Sep 24, 2020
and last updated 2020-09-24 06:35:09-04

While you were sleeping, we compiled the biggest stories of the day in one place. Each story has a quick and easy summary, so you're prepared for whatever the day brings. Just click on the links if you want to know more!

1. Breonna Taylor: 2 officers shot amid unrest following grand jury announcement
Two police officers were shot Wednesday evening in Louisville amid protests following an announcement that the two officers involved in fatally shooting Breonna Taylor would not be criminally charged.

One of the officers involved in Taylor's shooting, Brett Hankison, is being charged with three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment for firing into the apartments of Taylor's neighbors.

The two officers who were shot are expected to survive.

2 officers shot amid unrest in Louisville following grand jury announcement

2. Election 2020: Pres. Trump doesn’t commit to leaving office peacefully if he loses
President Donald Trump was asked on Wednesday if he would commit to leaving office peacefully in January if he loses to Joe Biden in November.

“We're going to have to see what happens, you know I have been complaining very strongly about the ballots. And the ballots are a disaster,” Trump said. "We want to get rid of the ballots, we'll have a very peaceful -- there won't be a transfer, frankly, there will be a continuation."

Also, a judge ruled Wednesday that President Donald Trump’s son Eric Trump must testify in a New York investigation into the family’s businesses before the November election.

3. Bloomberg vs DeSantis: Florida making itself the center of the election again
Gov. Ron DeSantis, Attorney General Ashley Moody and state Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis called for investigations Wednesday into former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg joining the effort to help Florida felons pay outstanding legal fees so they can register to vote in November.

Until 2018, Florida was one of just four states that automatically stripped away a felon’s right to vote.

Florida voters overwhelmingly passed Amendment 4 in in 2018, granting the automatic restoration of rights to nonviolent felons following their release. The Florida Legislature passed a bill requiring the payment of fines and fees before the restoration of rights, something that has significantly limited the scope of Amendment 4.

GOP in Florida takes aim at Michael Bloomberg over felons voting money

4. Reunited: Families finally allowed to visit long-term care centers
A March 15 emergency order to protect against the COVID-19 pandemic prevented Jaclyn Merens and her husband, Steven Rubenstein, from visiting their son, Daniel Rubenstein, at his Boca Raton group home.

Daniel has autism and has seen his parents only twice since March at doctor's appointments.

A state task force released recommendations Sept. 1 in an effort to safely allow visitation at more than 4,000 long-term care facilities in Florida, including homes like Daniel's.

Boca Raton family reunited after 188 days apart

5. The Heat have a hero on their side
Tyler Herro -- still just 20 years old -- scored a Heat rookie-record 37 points, Jimmy Butler had 24 and Miami beat the Boston Celtics 112-109 on Wednesday night in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference Finals.

Goran Dragic added 22 and Bam Adebayo had 20 points and 12 rebounds to help the Heat take a 3-1 lead in the best-of-seven series.

They can close it out Friday night in Game 5.

Today's Forecast
High pressure keeping the atmosphere on the drier side / Low rain chances today.

Latest Weather Forecast: Thursday 5 a.m.

Get your complete hour-by-hour forecast here.

On This Day In History
On Sept. 24, 1789 The Judiciary Act of 1789 is passed by Congress and signed by President George Washington, establishing the Supreme Court of the United States as a tribunal made up of six justices who were to serve on the court until death or retirement. That day, President Washington nominated John Jay to preside as chief justice, and John Rutledge, William Cushing, John Blair, Robert Harrison and James Wilson to be associate justices. On September 26, all six appointments were confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Remember, you can join Mike Trim and Ashleigh Walters every weekday on WPTV NewsChannel 5 beginning at 4:30 a.m.