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West Palm Beach community garden permanently closes

Stewart Bosley said since 2014, his mission is providing a community garden of fruits and vegetables.
Stewart Bosley said since 2014, his mission is providing a community garden of fruits and vegetables.
Stewart Bosley said since 2014, his mission is providing a community garden of fruits and vegetables.
Posted at 12:12 PM, Oct 16, 2021
and last updated 2021-10-16 12:12:50-04

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — A community garden in a part of West Palm Beach that's considered a food desert has officially closed its doors on Saturday after the city of West Palm Beach decided not to renew the lease.

The city released a statement. It said in part, "The city of West Palm Beach is grateful to Mr. Bosley for his prior involvement in the use of the city-owned property for urban farming. The city chose not to renew the lease to explore other opportunities and land purposes that will address other long-standing, critical needs in the city."

The Urban Growers Community Farm has been around since 2014 along Henrietta Avenue, a spot of town that is considered a food desert, leaving staff and locals alike disappointed.

"The community needs this, this is a part of them. And this is something that west palm beach should be doing for their community. Boynton Beach is doing it, Boca is doing it, Riviera Beach is doing it. We're the capitol city of Palm Beach County and we're not doing it, it's wrong," said Stewart Jr. Bosley, the executive director for Urban Growers Community Farm.

The city has said they are exploring other locations for a new garden but have not stated when or where.

According to Bosley many people in the area don't have a car or access to local transportation to fresh fruits or vegetables.

"The only encouragement I would have for them is to not give up the faith and to maybe grow some things in your own back yard since you're not going to have this space to get things from, but also let your governmental leaders, your commissioner and your mayor know your disappointment, your frustration over them taking something from the community," he said.

The city says they need the lot for other local needs and are considering the land for transitional housing.