NRA has record-breaking fundraising following Parkland school shooting

In the wake of the tragedy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, the National Rifle Association raked in a record $2.4 million in March.  That's $1.5 million more than the NRA typically gets in an average month. 

You've seen the waves of marches, protests, cries for more gun control in the wake of the Parkland school shooting, but what you may not have seen is the National Rifle Association's Political Victory Fund raking in nearly $2.5 million in the month following the school shooting. 

"We have no other recourse but to look to big brother to help us," said Alex Shkop, the owner at Guns and Range Training Center in West Palm Beach. 

"Big Brother," in this case, is the NRA.  

"We are almost being villainized," said Shkop. "If you own a gun, there has to be something wrong with you.  You must be evil, so that sentiment pushes us."

He said it pushes him to reach in his pocket and donate to the NRA. Brian Savino, a gun owner, donates on a smaller level but for the same reasons. 

"I feel like our rights are in jeopardy, and I think if we don't say something now, do something now, our kids are not going to have the opportunities we have," he said. 

Heavy donations following heated rhetoric is nothing new, according to Republican strategist Mary Anna Mancuso.  But this time, she said the activism drove donations from everyday people. 

"It was the activists coming out for stricter gun laws that allowed people, who are very pro-second amendment to turn around and say we can't allow, in their minds, kids to try and drive legislation," she said. 
 

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