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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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Artists start to work on Lake Worth Beach's Osborne Community Wall during MLK Weekend.This wall is a 1,100-foot cinder block wall that runs along Wingfield Street in the South end of Lake Worth Beach. There was a time when this wall represented separation. Today, the community of Lake Worth Beach said this wall will forever stand for people of all races and cultures coming together to break down the walls and barriers of hate, injustice.It was built in 1954, the wall served as an unofficial border between residents of the "Osborne Colored Addition" and their white neighbors in the Whispering Palms community at the city's south end. In 1954, the city's zoning code required Black residents to live in the Osborne subdivision. It remained that way until 1969.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker
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A look at what Lake Worth Beach's "Unity Wall" looks like after week 1 of the restoration.Photo by: T.A. Walker