Study finds hunger prevalent on college campuses

36 percent of students are 'food insecure'

With the rising cost of higher education, that is leaving fewer dollars in students' pockets. One example of the effect rising costs are possibly having on students is some students are going hungry. 

According to a Temple University study, nearly 36 percent of students were considered food insecure at some point in the proceeding 30 days of the study. Food insecurity is defined as limited or uncertain access to nutritional food. 

The study involved 66 institutions across 20 states and the District of Columbia. Four and two-year institutions were included in Temple's study. 

Also alarming according to the study was that 36 percent of college students were housing insecure, and 9 percent were homeless. 

And despite lower costs at two-year colleges, a higher percentage of students were facing food and housing insecurities. The study claimed 42 percent of students at two-year colleges faced food insecurities, compared to 36 percent at four-year schools. 

Although the costs are lower at community colleges, researchers believe the rising cost of college is a significant factor causing students to go hungry. 

"Prices have gone up over time," Sara Goldrick-Rab, a professor of higher education policy at Temple and the lead author of the report, told the Washington Post. "But the rising price is just a piece. This is a systemic problem." 

To read the full study, click here

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