Students plant, harvest and eat vegetables as part of science class

Garden helps defer food costs

DELRAY BEACH, Fla. - Kim Spells is packing up the collard greens she'll make for lunch tomorrow at Unity School in Delray Beach.

"I just take them, peel this off, cut them real fine and this is how they come out," said Spells, the school cook.

It's how they come in that has many students eager to try them. The vegetable is one of several the school planted in a campus garden this year.

"We planted seeds here, and then they grew," said 7th grade student Bella Gismondi. "I love collard greens, it's my favorite, I eat it everyday. They are natural, and cool because I prepared them."

For the last three years students learn to plant, harvest and then eat healthy. Peppers, tomatoes, green beans, cucumbers and herbs go straight to the kitchen. Teachers say the hands on approach has students excited to learn.

"They love getting down and measuring this out, digging them up and cultivating it for the salad bar. They say 'I planted this and picked that,'" said Lucille Grummer. "We've seen an increase in kids ordering from the salad bar."

Growing greens actually saves the school some green, about $200 dollars per year. Cafeteria staff rarely have to purchase vegetables.

For Kim who cooks it all up, it takes her back to her childhood.

"My grandfather had a farm, I used to help him and it's just like old times to me," said Spells.

 


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