Presidents Day trivia

(EndPlay Staff Reports) - Barack Obama is the 44th president to serve as the United States' leader. He's also the first president to write email as president.

These and other quirky trivia items are being circulated as Presidents Day approaches on Monday.

History.com shared technical firsts such as Obama's first presidential email. President Rutherford Hayes was the first to use a telephone, and President John Quincy Adams was the first to be photographed.

The first president to fly in an airplane while in office was Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1943, according to ipl2.org .

Move over saxophone-playing President Bill Clinton; other trivial items include that President Richard M. Nixon played the most musical instruments.

As far as the most weight gained in office, not quite a healthy record, that would go to President William Howard Taft who gained 50 pounds his first term. Once he left office he lost 75.

The oldest elected president was Ronald Reagan, the 40th president, aged 69 at the time. John F. Kennedy, the 35th president, was the youngest to be elected to the office at 43. President Theodore Roosevelt, who succeeded William McKinley after McKinley was assassinated, came into office at 42.

Eight presidents were left-handed.

On a somber note, InfoPlease noted that presidents John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe all died on the Fourth of July.

There's more. According to National Geographic , 6-foot, 4-inches tall President Abraham Lincoln was the tallest of the bunch. President James Madison, the county's fourth leader, who stood at 5-foot, 4-inches tall, was the shortest president.

The first to have a Christmas tree in the White House? Benjamin Harrison in 1889, complete with candles, according to ipl2.org .

Harrison, National Geographic stated, was also the first president to attend a baseball game when he saw the Cincinnati Reds beat the Washington Senators in 1892.

For more, the White House has posted information of all the presidents.

 

This story was updated to reflect the fact that it was John Adams who died on July 4th, not his son John Quincy Adams.

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