Plan B morning-after pill to move over-the-counter

Girls as young as 15 can purchase the drug

They're not old enough to drive alone, but they can access Plan B alone. Tuesday's decision to allow girls as young as 15 years old to get the morning-after pill over-the-counter has some parents fuming.

"It's terrible. For a 15-year-old to be encourage to have that pill, I disagree with it very much," says Leah Noves.

Noves' daughter will be 15 in October. The idea her teen could take the contraceptive without her knowledge she says, crosses the line.

"The worse thing would be her hiding it from me," says Noves.

The Food and Drug Administration says the decision is a compromise just days before a court-imposed deadline that would've lifted the age restriction on the emergency contraceptive altogether.

WPTV Analyst Dr. David Soria says the decision opens up options for teenagers facing unplanned pregnancy.

"It can safely eliminate 90% of unwanted pregnancies with no real side effects," says Dr. Soria.

The drug no longer has to be kept behind pharmacy counters. The pill can sit on drugstore shelves just like condoms, but buyers need to prove their age to purchase.

Parents say it puts too much power in the hands of children.

"A child isn't mature enough, isn't educated enough," says David Perez.

 


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