Chris Christie wants changes in medical marijuana bill to make it easier to help sick children

Changes to bill would make it easier for children

(CNN) -- New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Friday said he wants changes in a medical marijuana bill that could expand options for patients and make it easier for children to qualify for the program.

Christie told the Legislature that he would sign the bill if it stipulated that edible forms of marijuana would be dispensed only to minors, not to patients of all ages.

Another condition: Christie wants to delete a provision that would have let children qualify for the program with only a doctor's approval. Current law requires that children receive approval by at least a pediatrician and a psychiatrist.

The bill, S2842, would have added edible marijuana to the current dry-leaf and lozenge options for all qualified patients. Christie wants the bill to allow edible marijuana for qualified children only -- a move that would please parents concerned that the other options posed choking and other health concerns.

"Today, I am making commonsense recommendations to this legislation to ensure sick children receive the treatment their parents prefer, while maintaining appropriate safeguards," Christie said in a statement released Friday. "I am calling on the Legislature to reconvene quickly and address these issues so that children in need can get the treatment they need."

The bill also would eliminate a limit on the number of marijuana strains that the state's dispensaries can cultivate -- ostensibly making it more likely that they would carry versions that certain patients seek. Christie did not ask for changes to this provision.

Christie's decision came under pressure from an epileptic girl's father, who contends the bill would make it easier for her to get a version of the drug that might help her.

Brian Wilson's 2-year-old daughter, Vivian, suffers a version of epilepsy called Dravet syndrome. Normal epilepsy medications have so far failed to work for Vivian, and her family believes a certain type of medical marijuana -- one with high levels of cannabidiol, or CBD -- may be able to help. High-CBD strains of marijuana have helped other patients with Dravet Syndrome.

Vivian is cleared to receive medical marijuana, but the state's sole currently operating dispensary, limited by law to offering only three strains, does not offer the high-CBD marijuana her family seeks.

"It's a small victory but it's kind of ludicrous in some ways" Wilson told CNN's Jake Tapper after the decision was put forward Friday. "The psychiatrist is just a roadblock," he continued, arguing that many children in need of medical marijuana do not have psychological issues or are able to communicate with psychiatrists.

Trying to get an answer on the bill but unable to get a meeting with the governor, Wilson and members of his family on Wednesday crashed a small Christie campaign stop at a local diner in Scotch Plains. They beseeched the governor to sign the bill.

"I was wondering what the holdup was; it's been like two months now," Wilson said to Christie.

Christie responded that while the decision may be simple for Wilson, it's not as easy for the Republican governor. Christie is thought to be a major contender for his party's 2016 nomination for president.

"These are complicated issues," Christie told Wilson. "I know you think it's simple and it's not."

Christie has in the past expressed trepidation about marijuana. "I am not going to turn New Jersey into Colorado and California. I'm not legalizing marijuana in New Jersey," he said in July.

As for children, Christie said he was "very reluctant."

In separate remarks, Christie said that for the medical marijuana bill, "I'm concerned about expanding the program and I want to make sure that if we do it we do it in a way that is helpful to children," he said.

Christie worried about going "down the slippery slope of broadening a program and making it easier to get marijuana that wouldn't necessarily go to other people."

Regardless of whether Christie signsthe bill, it appears Vivian may soon have access to high-CBD marijuana. A dispensary expected to offer a high-CBD version is scheduled to open in New Jersey later this year, according to the New Jersey Department of Health.

Vivian's family also supported the bill because they prefer the edible form to lozenges -- which they say is a choking hazard and contains sugar, which is inadvisable for her condition -- and smoking.

The Wilson family and their supporters have a website called Letters for Vivian at which they urge people to write Christie and asked him to support the measure. The letter says that the type of medical marijuana they want for Vivian has no "high," with far less tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, than in recreational marijuana. THC is the active ingredient that gets people high.

According to the letter, Vivian has been signed up for medical marijuana, but she "has not received any medication due to New Jersey's overreaching and unsafe restrictions" on the medical marijuana program.

Opinions on the use of marijuana, particularly for medical

purposes, have shifted in the United States in recent years, with a growing chorus that it should be

"As I have repeatedly noted, I believe that parents, and not government regulators, are best suited to decide how to care for their children," said Christie in his conditional approval of the bill on Friday. "Protection of our children remains my utmost concern, and my heart goes out to those children and their families who are suffering with serious illnesses."

CNN's Jason Hanna contributed to this report.

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